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LEARNING & PLANNING TO BREASTFEED

​Navigate this page: 

Steps to take to plan for your pregnancy & breastfeeding

Create a birth plan 

Taking care of yourself and your baby during pregnancy

After you give birth

Get to know your baby's hunger cues

Learn About Breastfeeding Positions

Learn the steps you can take to prepare for your pregnancy and breastfeeding journey!

  • ​Get prenatal care

  • Communicate your plans to breastfeed with your doctor

  • Get insight about breastfeeding from friends, family, a circle of support, read blogs or watch videos etc. to help you make an informed decision,

  • Ask your doctor to recommend a lactation consultant

  • Talk to your doctor about your health and any medications or supplements you're on 

  • Take a breastfeeding class 

CREATE A BIRTH PLAN

During pregnancy we encourage you to write a birth plan. BWPC developed a birth plan to use as an example. 

Check out BWPC's Birth Plan here at bit.ly/BWPCbirthplan

Explore some other details to consider adding in your birth plan for an easier start with breastfeeding. Here are some language you can use:

  • "I  would like skin-to-skin right away after giving birth"

  • "I would like to breastfeed right after birth, add receive support from a certified lactation consultant"

  • "Please do not to give your baby pacifiers, sugar water, or formula, unless it is medically necessary"

  • "I would like to room-in with my baby after birth so I can breastfeed often"

TAKING CARE OF YOURSELF AND YOUR BABY DURING PREGNANCY

During pregnancy your provider will recommend screenings for birth defects and genetic syndromes and for some serious infections.

Some of the key screenings with ultrasound and blood test during pregnancy include: 

First trimester:

  • Down syndrome (trisomy 21)

  • Trisomy 18

  • Trisomy 13

Second trimester:

  • Baby’s heart development

  • Screening mothers for gestational diabetes

  • AFP Blood test – Maternal Serum Alfa Fetoprotein Screenings

Third trimester:

  • Group B strep (GBS) bacteria screening

  • Other screenings:

  • Syphilis

  • Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C

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After you give birth there are steps you can take to get your breastfeeding experience off to a good start.

  • Cuddle with your baby skin-to-skin right away after giving birth if you are both healthy.

  • Breastfeed as soon as possible after giving birth.

  • Ask the hospital staff not to give your baby pacifiers, sugar water, or formula, unless it is medically necessary.

  • Let your baby stay in your hospital room all day and night so that you can breastfeed often.

  • Ask for a lactation consultant to help you.

  • Try not to give your baby any pacifiers or artificial nipples until he or she is good at latching on to your breast (usually around 3 to 4 weeks old).

BREASTFEEDING IN THE FIRST HOURS AFTER BIRTH

Video credit to Global Health Media Project

GET TO KNOW YOUR BABY'S HUNGER CUES

Babies are born with the  ability to communicate.

They use cues to show parents what they need. 

 

When your baby is hungry they may:

  • Keep his hands near his mouth

  • Bend his arms and legs

  • Make sucking noises

  • Pucker his lips

  • Search for the nipple 

     

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Learn About Breastfeeding Positions